Strong Heart.
July 11, 2022

Why Generalist Education Moves us Forward

Why Generalist Education Moves us Forward

Helen talks about how different connections of interest propagate innovation and strengthens our analytical thinking.

Books mentioned:
1. Mastery by Robert Greene
2. Ego is the Enemy by Ryan Holiday
3. Range by David Epstein
4. Turning Pro by Steven Pressfield


Helen talks about how different connections of interest propagate innovation and strengthens our analytical thinking.

Books mentioned:

  1. Mastery by Robert Greene
  2. Ego is the Enemy by Ryan Holiday
  3. Range by David Epstein
  4. Turning Pro by Steven Pressfield

Transcript

So in the beginning of this think weird podcast, I essentially committed to recording one podcast episode every single Monday so that I could post it on a Tuesday, and I found that that is actually not the best habit for long term podcasting, because that means that I have to record, edit and publish on the same day, which is not viable and will only make me not like podcasting for the long term. So we have switched things up and now I'm recording this on a Sunday. I've actually recorded. I guess they call it like time blocking, where you record and do things multiple times in one day in a dedicated time where you have nothing else to do. So this is going to be my second podcast episode that I'm recording today and I feel like I'm on roll. And today we're talking about how the conglomeration of generalist education actually helps us serve a specific population with enjoyment long term and thereby increasing our productivity by tenfold compared to those who are just very specific and neuro focused in one area for longer periods of time. The reason why generalist practice is really effective for weird thinkers because sometimes thinking is likened to connecting different areas of interest when you're talking to one person, and I would argue that having multiple interests actually makes us a stronger analytical thinker because we're better able to tackle things in a way that helps variety of people understand the topic. So if you're interested in sports, music and mental health, you can speak to a variety of more people than someone who can only talk in neurological or neuroscientific terms when it comes to the medical model of mental health. If you're interested in multiple things, you can communicate and simplify information longer term to reach the audience that you intend to serve, or multiple audiences, if that's your goal. So, to start off, Robert Green actually wrote a book called Mastery where he discusses the importance of just being a present observer when you first start out in your career. He says that it's important to find an apprenticeship, to learn under someone for the first couple of years and to just understand how they do it and how you can fill in the gaps of what they think might be missing in their practice and what you notice to be missing in their practice. Now I'm going to add my own self analysis to this observation, because I think it's extremely important. If you look at Robert Green's own life and his own apprenticeship with Ryan Hall a day, you see that Ryan holiday actually learns from Robert Green's writing system where, if you've watched Ryan holidays youtube videos before on how he writes books, it's very similar to the way that Robert Green writes books in their index card system. But you start to see that there's an added layer of personal touched Ryan holiday's writing, where he has been in positions where ego has been the enemy of his own personal practice, where he started to realize that the obstacle is the way he started to infuse his own personal history into his story in the very beginning of ego is the enemy and I think that every writer does it differently. You can be in a place where you weren't marketing at a very young age, like Ryan holiday was, and then pivot to writing and really be in touch with where society is and understand where they might default because of that grade of practice. Now I've done two things here so far. I've taken the writing of Robert Green and I've studied his own life and his own teachings and how he's influenced Ryan holiday and I've also studied Ryan holiday and seeing how he's pivoted in his own life practice. Where Robert Green used to write screenplays, he's now pivoted to writing books. Ryan holiday has done marketing. He's now pivoted to writing several best selling books that have become landmarks for people in the personal development realm. Sometimes it's easy to see the lives of successful people and attribute their natural talent to where they are in life, but we failed to acknowledge that there were periods of searching and trying to figure out more of who they were in the very beginning stages of their careers. Did you know that Robert Green actually traveled around the world and watched people and as a way later, when he was in France, he saw a man just be really good at seduction and it actually propagated his studies and understanding of power and seduction, which is now two of his most best selling books. We have to remember that the generalist practice of our life experience can attribute to something so much deeper later in life, where we become known for the things that we witness. I think a famous writer once said this, where a lot of advice is autobiographical. There many books written is often autobiographical. I forgot who exactly said that. It was Austin Cleon who said all advice is autobiographical. Quote. Anyone who gives advice is speaking from their personal experience or point of view. Just because something worked for them doesn't mean it's going to work for you. Hence the argument for being receptive to all all of life's experiences, because we never know what we're going to get from our future endeavors or our past endeavors. Rather, one of the greatest life skills I think I've attained just from my past experiences as being a Barista for a couple of years. You learn to work with people close hand, to communicate with staff, to greeting people when you're at the cash register, to counting orders, counting money. It's taught me a lot of skills and how to work with people and how to be adaptable in any given situation. I think that little did I know that a career in food service would help me work and communicate in the effective way that I'm learning to communicate with you now. In addition, if you've ever read Stephen Pressfield's book turning pro he talks about this that his time picking apples was actually a side career that helped him write more books in the future. But he uses those stories in his books to prove a point that just because you're pro doesn't mean that you're outside of certain jobs, because when you're first starting out as an entrepreneur or a writer or someone in the creative field, you need something else to fund the career that you eventually want to fall into, and that takes a certain level of sacrifice but openness to that experience. He talks about his friend Dave, who he met when he actually overcame what he calls the resistance in the very beginning of him choosing to become a professional writer. He talks about renting out a room in northern California for a hundred and five dollars a month and then the off seasons, picking fruits every single season with this guy named Dave, and Dave essentially is this person who was really tough. He was from the navy and he learned how to pick apples with a roughness. He said that when it came to the mornings, the mornings were the hardest times to pick apples and they were extremely painful, but David was one of the best because he could pick apples despite the pain, and he relates that to being a pro. Despite the pain that you go through, are you willing to put in the effort? Do you see how I made that connection there, where that experience actually helped him write a story that helped me understand better what it was and what it meant to turn pro? I guess what I'm saying from this podcast episode is that you should always honor your journey. You never know how your present experiences might lead to a better understanding of where you're going to go tomorrow. Recently, I've actually taken up the hobby of rock climbing, indoor rock climbing to be specific, because when I tell people that I'm going climbing, they think that it's outdoor, which is something I'm definitely not yet trained for, but I hope to be in the future. And I overheard someone say that you can't ever trust one person's advice on how to climb a specific version of a trail, because the truth is everyone has a different style, they have a different body weight and a different level of flexibility that leads them to climb one trail differently than another person might climb the trail. And Life is sort of that way, where there's a specific set of morals that we live by as a society, but the way that we live that out is extremely different, based on the way that we've grown up and the experiences that we're part of. But we have to be careful about pigionholing ourselves or being quick to niche down when we haven't even figured out who we are. We all have a unique story to tell the world, but sometimes specializing way too early keeps us from experiencing an array of life experiences that might eventually lead us to the population we get excited about serving. My name is Helen Garcia and this is the think weird podcast. Today's episode was written, produced and edited by me, Helen. Eventually I hope to hire a staff, but for now this is just a one man band. If you'd like to support the show, please go to think weird dot co and just send me a thank you email. That's all I need. Your support keeps me going. Hope to hear from you soon and I hope to serve you in the very near future. My name is Helen Garcia. Talk to you later,